Giro d’Italia Guide

Here’s simple and accessible online Giro d’Italia guide. There’s a concise preview of every stage, with my quick take on the day added. Use the links to find your way around the stage previews, the rules and the other points. From now until the end of the race you’ll find the page linked at the top of the page, look for “Giro”.

Route Summary | Riders/Teams | Jerseys/Rules | Unmissable Stages | TV | iCal download

Stage 1 | Stage 2 | Stage 3 | Rest day
Stage 4 | Stage 5 | Stage 6 | Stage 7 | Stage 8 | Stage 9 | Rest day
Stage 10 | Stage 11 | Stage 12 | Stage 13 | Stage 14 | Stage 15 | Rest day
Stage 16 | Stage 17 | Stage 18 | Stage 19 | Stage 20 | Stage 21 |

In addition there will be coverage throughout the race with detailed daily previews of the stages as well as post race analysis of the key moments, commentary and a look at Italian cycling, culture and more.

Route summary

Now on to each stage. Note the annotations where TV = Traguardo Volante or Intermediate Sprint and R = Rifornimento or Feed Zone.


Stage 1 – Friday 6 May

As flat as a pizza, the 9.8km opening time trial will create an instant hierarchy for the overall classification. There are several bends along the way but with wide and sheltered roads this is for the powerhouse riders.


Stage 2 – Saturday 7 May

One for the sprinters with a small climb thrown in just so they can award the mountains jersey to someone but it’s no canal bridge, it’s a proper berg that’s a kilometre long. The finish includes laps of Nijmegen, birth place of Eddie van Halen so perhaps the victor will make an air guitar victory salute?


Stage 3 – Sunday 8 May

Back to Arnhem again via a mountains jersey contest and a likely sprint finish with finishing circuits around the town. A rest day awaits for some but for many it’s a long transfer to the south of Italy.


Stage 4 – Tuesday 10 May

The race resumes in Italy and the riders will be in no doubt as they pedal alongside the shimmering Mediterranean and past aromatic bergamot groves. The route darts inland now and then to add a climb. The race arrives into the finish town and then tackles with a sharp climb which tops out at 18% just 7km from the finish.


Stage 5 – Wednesday 11 May

An uphill start makes for a good launchpad for the day’s breakaway. If the rest of the day looks hilly the climbs are steady before a lap around Benvento including some cobbles the finishing straight.


Stage 6 – Thursday 12 May

The first uphill finish of the race but it’s too strong to call it a summit finish. There are 7% slopes on the way and an outside chance a very confident climber launches their move here to stun the others but it’s more a climb for punchy riders who can push a big gear rather than pure climbers.


Stage 7 – Friday 13 May

A stage across the Apennines before finishing in the plains and a flat run to Foligno. It should be a chance for the sprinters but look to see if any breakaway specialists took it easy on the previous day to save themselves for a raid here.


Stage 8 – Saturday 14 May

It could have been a flat rush to the line in Arezzo, perfect for the sprinters but once they reach the finish line they head out for a 10km long climb which is unpaved and reaches 13-14% in places before a tarmac descent and the scenic finish in Arezzo, uphill and paved with flagstones, as seen before in Tirreno-Adriatico.


Stage 9 – Sunday 15 May

One of the most important stages of the race, this 40km time trial through the Chianti vineyards will reshape the overall classification, a chance for some to gain time and others to flounder like fish out of water. The profile looks hilly but many of the climbs can be tackled in an aero tuck and the descents are fast and reward those who can spin their top gear.


Stage 10 – Tuesday 17 May

After the rest day comes a day of work with barely a metre of flat. The big climb of the day to the Pian del Falco ski resort is 16km at 5% but the final three kilometres are 9-10% before a tricky descent and then a 5-6% drag to the finish line for 7km. There should be a good battle for the stage win even if it’s likely to be indecisive for the overall classification.


Stage 11 – Wednesday 18 May

227km north towards the foot of the Alps and a profile that begs you to tune in late. The Forcella Mostaccin is a tough little climb above Maser, home of Sidi, that will have riders tightening their shoes as it’s 2.5km at 8%. There’s a claimed max of 16% but you’ll need your theodolite to find that. There’s 19km to go from the top to the finish but this includes a twisting descent and then some narrow roads with few flat sections to get a chase working.


Stage 12 – Thursday 19 May

A big day for the sprinters and a recovery day for the GC riders, TV watchers and preview writers alike who will all look to coast as much as possible. There are two finishing laps around Bibione, the seaside town that’s got Italy’s second longest beach (after Rimini in case you needed to know).


Stage 13 – Friday 20 May

At first glance this looks hilly and nothing more but ride the 170km and you and possibly your knees would be cursing that casual glance. This is a hard stage through the spiky Friuli region with some very steep roads and the mechanics will be busy fitting low gears and perhaps even compact chainsets for this stage.


Stage 14 – Saturday 21 May

A classic day in the Dolomites with many of the range’s best known climbs and a route that mirrors much of the popular Maratona gran fondo. The race goes beyond 2,000m above sea level five times and there’s more climbing in between. Expect two races here, a breakaway racing for the stage win and behind them the contenders for the overall classification testing each other. How early do the climbers have to attack in order to distance the others? Watch for the tricky finish and the Mür dl Giat, dialect for “Wall of the Cat” and a cruel 19% ramp with 5km to go.


Stage 15 – Sunday 22 May

A brave decision by the organisers to put a second time trial on a Sunday afternoon, prime time but will stage offer gripping television? For the riders this is a challenging test and far more than a tilt up the the mountain. Instead there are ever-changing gradients that incite the strongest to accelerate where they can and punish the weaker riders.


Stage 16 – Tuesday 24 May

Who had a successful rest day? Here’s a very short but explosive mountain stage. The Passo della Mendola is a long and gradual climb while the road the Fai della Paganella was used in the recent Giro del Trentino where Mikel Landa was so at ease as he contained attack after attack.


Stage 17 – Wednesday 25 May

A day away from the mountains as the race heads for the Adda valley, one of the hotbeds of Italian cycling, a late chance for the sprinters and breakaway contenders.


Stage 18 – Thursday 26 May

The race heads for the Alps and a very spiky finish. Pramartino is 4.6km at over 10% before the race drops into Pinerolo. You can’t see it on the profile above but it’s got a sharp climb, 500m up a narrow, stone-paved road that averages 14% and peaks at 20%.


Stage 19 – Friday 27 May

Say bonjour as the Giro crosses into France via the giant Colle dell’Agnello, the highpoint of the race – assuming it’s open and clear of snow – and fingers crossed the sun is shining because this should be a stunning day on the bike, at least until the steady ski station access road to Risoul which isn’t as scenic. It may look familiar as it’s where Vicenzo Nibali triumphed in 2014 on his way to winning the Tour de France.


Stage 20 – Saturday 28 May

The last day to win the Giro and what a course. At just 132km and an uphill start. the town of Guillestre will hum to the sound of riders warming-up before the Cols de Vars, a hard climb but a mere taster before the giant Bonette. Then comes the Col de la Lombarde and the race returns to Italy via a twisty descent a short but still significant final climb to the finish.


Stage 21 – Sunday 29 May

Basta! The final day is a parade as the race turns its back to the Alps and heads for the wealthy industrial city of Torino and a likely sprint finish.


Startlist – updated daily
AG2R LA MONDIALE
1 POZZOVIVO Domenico
2 BONNAFOND Guillaume
3 DOMONT Axel
4 DUPONT Hubert
5 GRETSCH Patrick
6 HOULE Hugo
7 KADRI Blel
8 MONTAGUTI Matteo
9 PERAUD Jean Christophe

ASTANA PRO TEAM
11 NIBALI Vincenzo
12 AGNOLI Valerio
13 CAPECCHI Eros
14 FUGLSANG Jakob
15 KANGERT Tanel
16 KOZHATAYEV Bakhtiyar
17 MALACARNE Davide
18 SCARPONI Michele
19 ZEITS Andrey

BARDIANI CSF
21 PIRAZZI Stefano
22 ANDREETTA Simone
23 SIMION Paolo
24 BOEM Nicola
25 BONGIORNO Francesco Manuel
26 CICCONE Giulio
27 COLBRELLI Sonny
28 MAESTRI Mirco
29 RUFFONI Nicola

BMC RACING TEAM
31 SENNI Manuel
32 ATAPUMA Darwin
33 DE MARCHI Alessandro
34 DILLIER Silvan
35 KÜNG Stefan
36 OSS Daniel
37 QUINZIATO Manuel
38 ROSSKOPF Joseph
39 ZABEL Rick

CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM
41 URAN URAN Rigoberto
42 CARDOSO Andre Fernando S.M.
43 CLARKE Simon
44 DOMBROWSKI Joseph Lloyd
45 FORMOLO Davide
46 MOSER Moreno
47 NAVARDAUSKAS Ramunas
48 BETTIOL Alberto
49 BROWN Nathan

TEAM DIMENSION DATA
51 ANTON Igor
52 FRAILE Omar
53 JIM Songezo
54 KUDUS Merhawi
55 SBARAGLI Kristian
56 SIUTSOU Kanstantsin
57 THOMSON Jay Robert
58 VAN ZYL Johann
59 VENTER Jacobus

ETIXX – QUICK-STEP
61 KITTEL Marcel
62 BRAMBILLA Gianluca
63 DE LA CRUZ David
64 JUNGELS Bob
65 SABATINI Fabio
66 SERRY Pieter
67 TRENTIN Matteo
68 VERONA Carlos
69 WISNIOWSKI Lukasz

FDJ
71 DEMARE Arnaud
72 COURTEILLE Arnaud
73 DELAGE Mickael
74 FISCHER Murilo Antonio
75 GENIEZ Alexandre
76 KONOVALOVAS Ignatas
77 LE GAC Olivier
78 SARREAU Marc
79 VAUGRENARD Benoit

GAZPROM – RUSVELO
81 KOLOBNEV Alexandr
82 RYBALKIN Aleksey
83 ERSHOV Artur
84 FIRSANOV Sergey
85 FOLIFOROV Alexander
86 OVECHKIN Artem
87 SAVITSKIY Ivan
88 SEROV Alexander
89 SOLOMENNIKOV Andrey

IAM CYCLING
91 HAUSSLER Heinrich
92 BRÄNDLE Matthias
93 HOWARD Leigh
94 KLUGE Roger
95 PELUCCHI Matteo
96 DENIFL Stefan
97 WARBASSE Lawrence
98 WYSS Marcel
99 LAENGEN Vegard Stake

LAMPRE – MERIDA
100 ULISSI Diego
101 CONTI Valerio
102 FERRARI Roberto
103 KOSHEVOY Ilia
104 MODOLO Sacha
105 MOHORIC Matej
106 MORI Manuele
107 NIEMIEC Przemysław
109 PETILLI Simone

LOTTO – SOUDAL
111 WELLENS Tim
112 BAK Lars
113 DE BIE Sean
114 GREIPEL André
115 HANSEN Adam
116 LIGTHART Pim
117 MONFORT Maxime
118 ROELANDTS Jurgen
119 VANENDERT Jelle

MOVISTAR
121 VALVERDE Alejandro
122 AMADOR Andrey
123 BETANCUR Carlos A.
124 HERRADA LOPEZ José
125 MORENO Javier
126 ROJAS GIL Jose Joaquin
127 SUTHERLAND Rory
128 SÜTTERLIN Jasha
129 VISCONTI Giovanni

NIPPO – VINI FANTINI
131 CUNEGO Damiano
132 BERLATO Giacomo
133 BISOLTI Alessandro
134 BOLE Grega
135 STACCHIOTTI Riccardo
136 FILOSI Iuri
137 GROSU Eduard Michael
138 YAMAMOTO Genki
139 ZILIOLI Gianfranco

ORICA GREENEDGE
141 CHAVES Esteban
142 BEWLEY Sam
143 EWAN Caleb
144 HEPBURN Michael
145 HOWSON Damien
146 MEZGEC Luka
147 PLAZA MOLINA Ruben
148 TUFT Svein
149 TXURRUKA Amets

TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN
151 DUMOULIN Tom
152 ARNDT Nikias
153 DE BACKER Bert
154 HAGA Chad
155 JI Cheng
156 LUDVIGSSON Tobias
157 PREIDLER Georg
158 STAMSNIJDER Tom
159 TIMMER Albert

TEAM KATUSHA
161 ZAKARIN Ilnur
162 BELKOV Maxim
163 KOCHETKOV Pavel
164 KUZNETSOV Viacheslav
165 VOROBYEV Anton
166 PORSEV Alexander
167 SILIN Egor
168 TAARAMAE Rein
169 TCATEVITCH Alexey

TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO
171 KRUIJSWIJK Steven
172 BATTAGLIN Enrico
173 HOFLAND Moreno
174 CASTELIJNS Twan
175 KEIZER Martijn
176 ROGLIC Primoz
177 TANKINK Bram
178 TJALLINGII Maarten
179 VAN EMDEN Jos

TEAM SKY
181 LANDA Mikel
182 BOSWELL Ian
183 DEIGNAN Philip
184 HENAO Sebastian
185 NIEVE Mikel
186 KNEES Christian
187 LOPEZ GARCIA David
188 ROCHE Nicholas
189 VIVIANI Elia

TINKOFF
191 MAJKA Rafal
192 BOARO Manuele
193 BRUTT Pavel
194 HERNANDEZ Jesus
195 MCCARTHY Jay
196 POLJANSKI Pawel
197 ROVNY Ivan
198 PETROV Evgeny
199 TOSATTO Matteo

TREK – SEGAFREDO
201 HESJEDAL Ryder
202 ALAFACI Eugenio
203 BOBRIDGE Jack
204 CANCELLARA Fabian
205 COLEDAN Marco
206 DIDIER Laurent
207 NIZZOLO Giacomo
208 VAN POPPEL Boy
209 ZOIDL Riccardo

WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST
211 POZZATO Filippo
212 AMERZQUETA Julen
213 BELLETTI Manuel
214 BERTAZZO Liam
215 BUSATO Matteo
216 RODRIGUEZ Cristian
217 MARECZKO Jakub
218 MARTINEZ Daniel
219 ZHUPA Eugert


The Jerseys
There are four jerseys in the race: pink, blue, red and white.

Pink: the most famous one, the maglia rosa, it is awarded to the rider with the shortest overall time for all the stages added together. As such, they have covered the course faster than anyone else. It is pink because the race has always been organised by newspaper La Gazzetta Dello Sport which is printed on bright pink paper. It is sponsored by Enel, an energy company.

There are time bonuses available on all the stages except the individual time trials.

  • 10 seconds for the winner, six seconds for second place and four seconds for third place on each stage
  • Also for the intermediate sprints of the day three, two and one seconds are available for the first three riders

Blue: the mountains jersey. It was green in the past but is now blue, the maglia azzurra. It is sponsored by Banca Mediolanum, a bank. Points are available on the climbs in the race with this year’s edition tilting more points to the winner over the bigger climbs . There are five categories of climb:

  • Five fourth category climbs: the first three riders crossing the top of the climb win 3, 2 and 1 points respectively.
  • 10 third category climbs: the first four riders over the top get 7, 4, 2, 1 points
  • 12 second category climbs: first six riders get 15, 8, 6, 4, 2, 1 points
  • 10 first category climbs: the first eight riders get 35, 18, 12, 9, 6, 4, 2, 1 points
  • Cima Coppi: a special award, the “Coppi Summit” for the highest point of the race. This year it is the Colle dell’Agnello on Stage 19. The first nine win points: 45, 30, 20, 14, 10, 6, 4, 2, 1 points

Red: the points competition. Riders pick up points at the intermediate sprints, the traguardi volanti marked as “TV” on the profiles above and at the finish line. The allocation of points depends on the stage in question, they are categorised with the typical sprint stages offering more points in a bid to place the red jersey on the shoulders of a sprinter who is handy with mental arithmetic. It is sponsored by Algida, a brand of ice cream.

  • Category A+B stages (Stages 2,3,4,5,7,11,12,17,21) offer points for the first 15 riders at the finish: 50, 35, 25, 18, 14, 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. For the TV there are points for the first eight: 20, 12, 8, 6, 4, 3, 2, 1.
  • Category C stages: (Stages 6,8,16,18) offer points for the first 10: 25, 18, 12, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. For the TV there are points for the first five: 10, 6, 3, 2, 1
  • Category D + E stages: (Stages 1,9,10,13,14,15,19,20) offer points for the first 10: 15, 12, 9, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. For the TV there are points for the first three: 8, 4, 1

White: for the best young rider, this is awarded on the same basis as the pink jersey, except the rider must be born after 1 January 1991, ie aged 25 or under. It is sponsored by Euro Spin, a discount supermarket.

Obviously a rider can’t wear two jerseys at once, they’d get too hot. So if a rider leads several classifications, they take the most prestigious jersey for themselves and the number two ranked rider in the other competition gets to wear the other jersey. For example if a rider has both the pink jersey and the blue mountains jersey they’ll wear pink whilst whoever is second in the mountains jersey will sport blue jersey.

There are also a host of daily prizes which keep the podium ceremonies going for some time.


The unmissable stages
Anything can happen during the Giro but there are some stages that matter more than others.

Stage 6 – Thursday 12 May: the first uphill finish
Stage 8 – Saturday 14 May: the offroad climb, the uphill finish in Arezzo
Stage 9 – Sunday 15 May: the 40km Chianti time trial stage. Maybe it won’t be gripping TV but it is decisive
Stage 10 – Tuesday 17 May: a hard mid-mountain stage
Stage 13 – Friday 20 May: the steep Friuli mountain stage
Stage 14 – Saturday 21 May: the day of the Dolomites
Stage 19 – Friday 27 May: a big mountain stage, albeit with a steady finishing climb
Stage 20 – Saturday 28 May: the final mountain stage, a coronation parade or is the race still up for grabs?

Giro RAI


TV viewing
The race will be on according to where you are in the world. Eurosport is covering the race across most of Europe. beIN SPORT has the rights in the US and France.

Italian host broadcaster RAI offers the best coverage with experienced commentators as well as roving reporters on motorbikes to add extra coverage. As ever cyclingfans.com, cyclinghub and steephill.tv are the go-to sites for schedules and pirata feeds. The timing will vary but the finish is expected for around 5.15pm CET each day.


Giro iCal
The Giro awards stars to each stage to indicate the difficulty or importance, from one to five stars for the biggest days.

iCal file

Save the ics / iCal / iCalendar file and you can import it into your electronic diary. One or two clicks and it’s on your iPhone / Outlook etc.

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{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

The Inner Ring May 2, 2016 at 8:44 pm

A note to say the rules section with the classification system for the climbs and points jersey is pending for now and based on 2015, the Giro has yet to publish the “Regolamento” for 2016.

Reply

Lukas W. May 7, 2016 at 3:52 pm

Can’t find the “regolamento” for the 2016 edition anywhere! It seems rather odd to me given that the race has started. Any luck on your part?

Reply

The Inner Ring May 11, 2016 at 12:17 pm

I’ve put the points scale in the piece above now if that helps. If you want more, email me, happy to help.

Reply

Larry T. May 2, 2016 at 9:31 pm

Ah, my favorite time of the year. Don’t know if I’ll be able to sneak off to see anything live but with some free time later this month I’ll give it a try. W Il Giro! W Inrng!

Reply

lachlan May 3, 2016 at 3:13 am

Thanks for the stage profiles and short summary. One minor edit, no team time trial this year (mentioned after time bonuses).

Reply

J Evans May 3, 2016 at 9:16 am

Do you know that this doesn’t show up on the front page of the website – or at least on my computer – only found it because it was in the ‘recent comments’ section.

Reply

The Inner Ring May 3, 2016 at 9:20 am

See “Giro” at the top of the page if you’re on the desktop version or “Giro” on the drop-down if you use mobile. It’s a page intended as a background reference for the rest of the month but I’ll do a copy-paste blog post with the stage profiles today.

Reply

J Evans May 3, 2016 at 9:30 am

Thanks for this: hugely useful when trying to work out when to tune in – and how much work to give up. Doesn’t look to inspiring until about Stage 13.
Stage 14 should be all the better for not being a summit finish – good finish to Stage 20 too.
Agree that it’s odd, at best, to put the uphill TT on the w/e.

Reply

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